Memoirs of Professor Peter Davison

The Orwell Society is proud to publish the memoirs of Professor Peter Davison, editor of the Facsimile Edition of Nineteen Eighty-Four, and the twenty-volume Complete Works of George Orwell. In 2017 the Folio Society has published a single volume illustrated edition of the the Orwell Diaries and Life in Letters, edited by Professor Davison. Our…Read more Memoirs of Professor Peter Davison

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Animal Farm at the National Arts Festival in South Africa

Seven decades have passed since the first publication of Orwell’s Animal Farm, yet the plight of Manor Farm and its animal denizens is ever relevant in contemporary South Africa. The story persistently transports the audience into the complex realities of not only the rise of the Soviet Union, and the power, propaganda and political corruption…Read more Animal Farm at the National Arts Festival in South Africa

Not Hampstead But Hong Kong: George Orwell and the Booksellers

[Our anniversary articles have identified the stylistic similarities between George Orwell's Keep The Aspidistra Flying and his bleaker and better known Nineteen Eighty-Four. Professor Douglas Kerr of Hong Kong University points out more disturbing connections between the two in the real world now] When Gordon Comstock, in Orwell’s Keep the Aspidistra Flying, went to work…Read more Not Hampstead But Hong Kong: George Orwell and the Booksellers

Keep the Aspidistra Flying: Getting Closer to the Original Text

By Richard Young In 1945 George Orwell reviewed his career and wrote notes to his literary executor: two of his novels should never be republished. The first was A Clergyman's Daughter. The other was Keep the Aspidistra Flying ('Aspidistra') which he described as a ‘silly potboiler’ he should never have written. By 1945 Aspidistra had…Read more Keep the Aspidistra Flying: Getting Closer to the Original Text

No Surrender To The Status Quo? Orwell's Keep The Aspidistra Flying

By M.G. Sherlock 'It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.' If those words seemed familiar to some readers in 1949 it may have been because they had a faint recall of something similar by the same author: 'The clock struck half past two… The ding-dong of another, remoter…Read more No Surrender To The Status Quo? Orwell's Keep The Aspidistra Flying